8/9/12

Angora and mohair yarns

Angora wool or Angora fibre refers to the downy coat produced by the Angora rabbit. Angora is known for its softness, thin fibres, and what knitters refer to as a halo (fluffiness). It is also known for its silky texture. It is much warmer and lighter than wool due to the hollow core of the angora fiber.

Mohair usually refers to a silk-like yarn made from the hair of the Angora Goat. Mohair fiber is one of the oldest textile fibers in use. It is both durable and resilient. It is notable for its high luster and sheen, which has helped give it the nickname the "Diamond Fiber," and is often used in fiber blends to add these qualities to a textile. Mohair also takes dye exceptionally well. Mohair is also warm as it has great insulating properties. It is durable, and resistant to moisture-wicking, stretch, flame and creases. It is considered to be a luxury fiber, like cashmere, angora and silk, and is usually more expensive than most wool that comes from sheep.

Mohair increases its diameter with the age of the goat, growing along with the animal. Fine hair from younger animals is used for finer applications such as clothing, and the thicker hair from older animals is more often used for carpets and heavy fabrics intended for outerwear.

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